Frontline community services

Why the snapshot?

Across the world the health and community services sectors have been overwhelmed by acute reactions to the COVID-19 virus. ‘Flattening the curve’ has become a key objective for many governments, with community ‘staying safe at home’ being an important part of containing the spread.

Frontline workers are undertaking vital tasks that place them at risk for the good of our communities. With lockdowns, quarantine and social distancing come a range of unintended consequences that place significant pressure upon the community services sector and their frontline workers.

Financial hardship, homelessness, domestic violence, child protection, through to drug and alcohol addiction, are complex issues that stand to be compounded by necessary responses to the COVID-19 pandemic. Mental health, aged-care and disability support services, to name a few, all have to operate in this new environment where the safety and wellbeing of both frontline workers and communities needs to be continually monitored and reassessed.

In collecting this data, TAASE will:

  • Identify key community sector pressure points (nationally and at state and territory levels).
  • Track challenges for both staffing and community members in need of support.
  • Share success stories from across the nation.
  • Develop and evidence base to rapidly advocate for the sector.

The voices of all community services workers are important. Initially we restricted survey responses to leaders and line managers (from CEOs to team leaders). This was to ensure that the data was manageable and reflected reported stress points and bottlenecks within organisations. However, we have now opened the survey up to frontline community sector workers to help provide a clearer picture of the pressure points that organisations and their clients are experiencing.

If you are a leader, manage staff or a frontline worker please do consider completing and sharing this survey.


This project was assessed as negligible risk by the University of South Australia’s Business School Ethics Committee (protocol no: 64/2020).

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